DallasSeaborn
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Not sure what an agitator is but washing a dry suit is simple. You just need to use a wash product made specifically for waterproof breathable fabric. I use Atsko Sport-Wash because it's cheaper than Nikwax tech wash and ReviveX pro cleaner and it's more or less the same thing...you can get it at Walmart and it comes in 2-quart size for 64 loads. Compare that to Nikwax or ReviveX and you'll be saving quite a bit of money.

1) You can hand wash your suit with a soft bristled brush. This is gentle and through but time consuming. Rinse throughly afterward.

2) Wash it in a top load washing machine. This is easy, pretty quick, and isn't too hard on your gear. Just make sure all the zippers are zipped and the velcro is secure. I usually do one wash to get the outside of the suit clean then flip it inside out and clean the inside. It's more important for the inside to be clean so i do that second. I generally put it on a rinse cycle after each wash.

3) Wash it in a top load machine... be careful this method can put unnecessary wear on your garment. Only wash it in a top load machine if you can't do option 1 or 2. Really this is a last resort. Who wants to take life out of their $1000 garment? If you have to do it this way... make sure you choose the most gentle cycle. If this is your only option and you really want to be easy on your suit you can put it in a mesh bag then in the washing machine. This will result in a less thorough clean... but hey your suit isn't going to get quite as beat up in the machine.

After you wash it hang it to dry on a plastic hanger. Don't use a metal hanger (copper or copper alloys in it will cause the gasket to break down). After your suit is dry store it folded loosely in an airtight container to minimize exposure to air. Contrary to popular belief ozone (o3) is the main contributor to gasket failure. Keeping your suit loosely folded in a tied garbage bag will limit the exchange of o3 keeping your gaskets fresh longer... and no 303 isn't the answer. It's actually show to more or less useless (for increasing neck/wrist gasket life) in testing... sure it can make a sticky gasket a little easier to put on... but so does talc.
DallasSeaborn
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I know this is a bit unrelated, but for best care should an agitator be avoided when washing?
DallasSeaborn
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Here's the deal with DWR... It stands for durable water repellant. It's a coating applied to the face of fabric to keep it from absorbing water. Most of the time this is done to aid breathability. Usually it's applied at the time the fabric is made... but it rubs and wears off... so there are aftermarket DWR applications. Just to be clear DWR doesn't have any effect on waterproofness.

The waterproof part of your skirt is the neoprene... and glue that holds it together. In this case DWR isn't going to do much... except maybe help your skirt dry faster. I made neoprene seat covers for my Suzuki Sidekick. I apply DWR to them so I can stand on my seats to load boats and just brush off the water after giving rides to wet kayakers. Aftermarket DWR isn't nearly as strong as the stuff they apply at the factory and doesn't last long so I have to reapply it pretty often. If your skirt is leaking there are either holes in the neoprene or the glued seams are breaking down (glue lost elasticity and has cracked) and need to be re-glued. Either way neoprene cement will help. Don't use aquaseal. I can get into that if you want.

In the case of your dry suit the waterproof part is the waterproof/breathable microporous membrane... either a laminate or coating depending on who made the fabric. This is the (usually white) layer between the face fabric and the mesh tricot that you see on the inside. The waterproof/breathable layer is either made from PTFE or PU. If your suit is leaking it probably needs to be pressure tested and have some patch work performed. A decent repair shop will pump the suit full of air, spray it down with soapy water, find any leaks, and apply patches specific to that type of fabric when they find any areas that need attention. Always wash your suit before you send it in. Patches will adhere to clean fabric much better than disgusting fabric coating in body oils... plus the repair guy is going to be putting this suit in a heat press repeatedly for a while... most likely around the crotch, seat, and feet...have some mercy on that poor soul.

After you get your suit back you can apply an Aftermarket DWR Spray if you'd like. Sprays are great because they allow you to target high wear areas... like where your life jacket rubs...or under your arm pits. Don't use a wash in DWR treatment because it will treat the inside of the fabric as well as the outside. Treating the inside will impair breathability. Some people don't find it to be worth using aftermarket DWR at all because it doesn't last very long in the whitewater environment. It's great for alpine conditions... but doesn't quite hold up as well in the conditions we put gear through.
DallasSeaborn
what do you all use . my skirt and suit could use a good water shedding spray ???
DallasSeaborn
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BoaterTalk
thanks alot!
DallasSeaborn
Looking for a paddle club in or around McMinnville tn. If any one knows of groups let me know cookville and murfreesboro arent out of range either . Thanks for any help
DallasSeaborn
I've spent time below the damn in rock island . Does any one have a visual map listing the names of the features and holes. im new to lingo and such so it makes it hard to know what's what . I've heard terms like sieve city and i just do better with visuals thanks alot
DallasSeaborn
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175 lbs in the medium can work downriver, but only if you have the leg-room to get in the middle seating position. Otherwise you'd want to be in the Large for more Creek/River running. Thanks for the report!
Stephen
JK